Friday, March 17, 2006

Straits Times Survey: Almost Half Of Respondents Don't Trust Straits Times

Oops! From today's Straits Times:
Believe those blogs? Only 1 per cent find them credible IT MANAGER Jerry Chia, 34, trusts the newspaper in his hand more than a fleeting TV snippet for his daily dose of local news. To keep up with local politics, he would rather read a page of analysis in the newspaper than catch a newsflash on TV. His preference is typical of 88 per cent of young Singaporeans who rely on newspapers for news on local politics, according to a survey commissioned by The Straits Times [1]. TV is a close second, with 87 per cent... When it comes to credibility, newspapers top the list. They were considered most credible by almost 60 per cent, while 35 per cent picked TV... [2] Agreeing, magazine writer Sim Jui Liang, 31, said: 'Newspapers have more depth. You can't compare full-page coverage in print to a one-minute coverage on a news bulletin.' Lagging far behind on credibility are news websites (3 per cent) and Internet blogs and forums (1 per cent). [3] Miss Poon Jiat Ling, 22, a pharmacy student at the National University of Singapore, offers a possible reason: Mainstream media is more comprehensive and objective in its coverage while blogs are more personal and 'can be heavily biased' [4]...
[1] It's time people with online diaries and folks from TVLand start commissioning their own surveys! [2] Even the survey commissioned by the newspaper found that 40 percent of respondents don't find the newspaper to be credible, assuming that the article title is correct! I mean, wow! The title of this article shouldn't be about bloggers; it should really be: Almost Half Of This Newspaper's Readers Don't Find It Credible ! [3] One percent of respondents find blogs credible. I really do hope that most, if not all, of the readers of this blog make up the 1 out of 100 people who find blogs mildly credible! [4] Too funny, considering [2] LOL. Update (!): Mr. Miyagi was nice enough to feature this blog in his weekly column for the Today newspaper. More from tomorrow.sg.

8 comments:

StupidGenius said...

erm... 60% found it most credible rite? so meaning the other 40% may not find it uncredible? just less credible?

anyway, who would belief a survey conducted by a newspaper that day they are most credible??

jeffyen said...

Yes, you've found a possible punchline! That was why I wrote 'assuming the title of the newspaper article is correct'.

Assuming that the numbers 60, 35, 3 and 1 all result from a similar question in the survey, the headline writer chose to interpret the 1% number as 'Believe those blogs? Only 1% find them credible'. Note that the title is not 'only 1% find them most credible'.

If this is indeed a correct interpretation, then it's not unreasonable to say that 'only 55-60% of folks find newspaper credible', which is to say that 40-45% of folks find them not credible, which is like...well... almost half!

I'm more inclined to think that the more correct interpretation would be 'only 1% find them most credible', but we need to see what the question in the survey actually was. But it's fun to run with what you have...hehe...

7-8 said...

Or else the question could be "list down the sources that you'd find credible".

DK said...

I smell detergent.....

Is someone trying to wash my brain?

eric said...

iss Poon Jiat Ling, 22, a pharmacy student at the National University of Singapore, offers a possible reason: Mainstream media is more comprehensive and objective in its coverage

Wow.. which rock has Ms Poon been hiding under?

Anonymous said...

I have created a blog about being confused about one's sexuality. What is the real meaning of being gay? The answers at http://whybegay.blogspot.com

jeffyen said...

Without actually seeing what the survey question was, we don't have much to go on.

I'm not sure what rock it is, but I'd sure like to have tea with her! Fascinating!

dk, I believe the correct term is Kool-Aid haha

Mr Miyagi said...

No worries, dude. Well put comment on the MSM tirade against blogs.